The adventures of Beck and The Brady

The+adventures+of+Beck+and+The+Brady

Reagan Rinehart, Student Life Editor

Psychedelic desert. It’s an animation projected on the giant screen behind Beck, a band lead by Beck Hansen, who was first noticed in 1993 with the hit “Loser“. Beck has remained a fascinating figure within music and he recently showed his diverse range at the historic Brady Theatre in downtown Tulsa. Wavy dirt, sprinting foxes, turtles, bunnies and round cacti run in and out between angular patterns as Beck and his band hype up the crowd.

It’s Tuesday, October 7th, and this is just the beginning of the second part of the show. At the beginning of the first part, Beck announced they would be “opening for themselves” with some songs from his new album, Morning Phase. Now the band has walked out, returning to the stage as the headliner, to perform some of Beck’s older, faster songs; classics that the crowd loses their minds over.

Beck’s newest album features songs that are slower and more soothing than his previous work, but with the same funky, soulful, alternative feel. From his new album, he played “Waking Light,” “Blue Moon,” “Heart is a Drum,” and “Say Goodbye”. Despite the mellowness of this album, Beck is still entertaining to watch, and the crowd stood, enjoying the music and the show as Beck feels out the crowd and the music. And when Beck dances around stage for the faster songs, even watching from a distance, his smallness is emphasized. He moves so crazily around on stage, he looks spritely, and its entertaining to watch him interact with the audience and his band members.

In the second half of his show, the crowd got moving, and people traveled out to into the isles to have more room to dance. During the first half of the show, I remember being upset that Beck wasn’t wearing his signature black hat, but to my delight, for the second half, he broke it out and danced around the stage for the songs “Think I’m in Love,” “Hell Yes,” “Devil’s Haircut,” “Loser,” “Sexx Laws,” “Beercan,” “Debra,” “Que Onda Guero,”  and “Where it’s At“.

The high point of the show was during “Loser”, which was stretched out long enough to give each band member a solo, and was the finale of the show. The crowd sang along for the entire song, and most of the songs in the second half. It was great to go to a show where the fans were loyal enough to know so many of the songs they played. The show ended when the three guitar players ran across the stage in a mock fight, “killed” each other beneath the dramatic red and black patterns being animated on the screen, and fell to the ground. Beck then pulled out a roll of police tape and walked it across the stage, hung it, and followed the band offstage.

I left with the crowd, speechless and in wonder. Out of all the shows I’ve been to, this was probably the best. Beck’s energy and creativity was brought to life and shared with all of us, making this a lifetime experience.